December 1, 2022

Using Ice To Boil Water: Heat Transfer Discovery Expands on 18th Century Physics Principle

Associate Professor Jonathan Boreyko and graduate fellow Mojtaba Edalatpour have made a discovery about the properties of water that might provide an amazing addendum to a phenomenon developed over 2 centuries back. The discovery likewise holds fascinating possibilities for cooling devices and procedures in commercial applications using only the fundamental properties of water. Their work was released today (January 21, 2022) in the journal Physical Review Fluids.
Water can exist in three stages: a frozen solid, a liquid, and a gas. When heat is used to a frozen solid, it becomes a liquid.

When the heat source is hot enough, the waters behavior modifications significantly. According to Boreyko, a water bead transferred onto an aluminum plate heated to 150 degrees Celsius (302 degrees Fahrenheit) or above will no longer boil. Rather, the vapor that forms when the bead approaches the surface area will become trapped beneath the bead, producing a cushion that avoids the liquid from making direct contact with the surface area. The trapped vapor causes the liquid to levitate, moving around the heated surface area like an air hockey puck. This phenomenon is understood as the Leidenfrost result, called for the German physician and theologian who initially described it in a 1751 publication.
This commonly accepted clinical principle applies to water as a liquid, drifting on a bed of vapor. Boreykos group discovered themselves questioning: Could ice carry out in the same method?
” There are many documents out there about levitating liquid, we wished to ask the concern about levitating ice,” stated Boreyko. “It started as a curiosity job. What drove our research study was the question of whether or not it was possible to have a three-phase Leidenfrost result with strong, liquid, and vapor.”
Enjoy video of ice levitating.
Going into the ice
Interest stimulated the very first investigation in Boreykos laboratory some five years ago in the type of a research job by then-undergraduate trainee Daniel Cusumano. What he observed was fascinating. Even when the aluminum was warmed above 150 C, the ice did not levitate on vapor as liquid does. Cusumano continued raising the temperature level, observing the behavior of the ice as the heat increased. What he discovered was that the limit for levitation was drastically greater: 550 C (1022 F) rather than 150 C. Up up until that threshold, the meltwater underneath the ice continued to boil in direct contact with the surface area, rather than exhibit the Leidenfrost impact.
What was going on beneath the ice that lengthened the boiling? The task was picked back up by college student Mojtaba Edalatpour a short time later, to solve the mystery. Edalatpour had actually been dealing with Boreyko to develop unique approaches of heat transfer and put that knowledge to operate in approaching this problem. The answer ended up being the temperature differential in the meltwater layer underneath the ice. The meltwater layer has two various extremes: Its bottom is boiling, which repairs the temperature level at about 100 C, but its top is followed the remaining ice, which repairs it at about 0 C. Edalatpours model exposed that the upkeep of this extreme temperature differential consumes most of the surfaces heat, discussing why levitation was harder for ice.
Boreyko elaborated. “The temperature level differential the ice is uniquely developing throughout the water layer has changed what takes place in the water itself, since now many of the heat from the hot plate needs to go across the water to preserve that extreme differential. Just a small fraction of the energy can be used to produce vapor any longer.”
The raised temperature of 550 degrees Celsius for the icy Leidenfrost impact is almost important. Boiling water is efficiently transferring heat away from the substrate, which is why you feel ample heat rising from a pot of water that is boiling, but not from a pot of water that is simply hot. This indicates that the problem in levitating ice is in fact an excellent thing, as the larger temperature level window for boiling will result in much better heat transfer compared to using a liquid alone.
” It is much more difficult to levitate the ice than it was to levitate the water bead,” said Boreyko. “Heat transfer plummets as soon as levitation begins, because when liquid levitates, it doesnt boil any longer.
Utilizing ice for heat transfer
As the group explored possibilities for practical application, they sought to their existing work. Given that Edalatpour had substantial research study in heat transfer, that subject became a rational fit.
Heat transfer comes most into play for cooling off things like computer servers or automobile engines. It requires a compound or system that can move energy far from a hot surface area, redistributing heat quickly to lower the wear and tear on metal parts. In nuclear reactor, the application of ice to cause rapid cooling might become an easily-deployed emergency measure if power stops working, or a routine practice for servicing power plant parts.
There are also possible applications for metallurgy. To produce alloys, it is required to quench the heat from metals that have been shaped in a narrow window of time, making the metal more powerful and less fragile. If ice were used, it would enable heat to be unloaded quickly through the 3 water phases, rapidly cooling the metal.
Boreyko also anticipates a capacity for applications in firefighting.
” You could think of having actually a specifically made hose that is spraying ice chips rather than a jet of water,” he said. “This is not sci-fi. I checked out an aerospace company that has an icing tunnel and they already have this technology where a nozzle sprays out ice particles instead of water beads.”
With myriad possibilities, Boreyko and Edalatpour are excited about the new contribution that has come to the science world. Recalling over the previous five years, they still credit this interesting development to their shared spark of curiosity and the drive to be innovative in research.
Referral: 21 January 2022, Physical Review Fluids.DOI: 10.1103/ PhysRevFluids.00.004000.

When the heat source is hot enough, the waters behavior modifications dramatically. According to Boreyko, a water bead transferred onto an aluminum plate heated to 150 degrees Celsius (302 degrees Fahrenheit) or above will no longer boil. “The temperature differential the ice is uniquely creating throughout the water layer has changed what happens in the water itself, due to the fact that now many of the heat from the hot plate has to go across the water to preserve that severe differential. Boiling water is optimally transferring heat away from the substrate, which is why you feel adequate heat rising from a pot of water that is boiling, but not from a pot of water that is merely hot. If ice were applied, it would allow heat to be unloaded quickly through the 3 water stages, rapidly cooling the metal.

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