June 19, 2024

Sun Blasts Out 3 Powerful Bursts of Energy in Last 24 Hours

NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory caught this image of a solar flare– as seen in the brilliant flash in the center of the image– on May 4, 2022. In the last 24 hours, the sun released two M-class solar flares and one X-class flare. The Sun discharged a moderate solar flare on May 4, 2022, peaking at 5:00 a.m. ET. NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory caught this image of a solar flare– as seen in the intense flash in the lower-left part of the image– on May 3, 2022. NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this image of a solar flare– as seen in the intense flash in the bottom left portion of the image– on May 3, 2022.

NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this picture of a solar flare– as seen in the brilliant flash in the center of the image– on May 4, 2022. The image shows a subset of severe ultraviolet light that highlights the incredibly hot product in flares, and which is colorized in yellow. Credit: NASA/SDO
In the last 24 hours, the sun discharged 2 M-class solar flares and one X-class flare. On the scale used to classify solar flares, X-class are the most extreme, and M-class is one level listed below that. This begins the heels of numerous other large outbursts.
The Sun discharged a moderate solar flare on May 4, 2022, peaking at 5:00 a.m. ET. NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory, which enjoys the Sun constantly, captured an image of the occasion. This flare is categorized as an M-class flare.
NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a solar flare– as seen in the bright flash in the lower-left portion of the image– on May 3, 2022. The image reveals a subset of severe ultraviolet light that highlights the incredibly hot product in flares, and which is colorized in yellow. Credit: NASA/SDO
The Sun emitted a moderate solar flare on May 3, 2022, peaking at 8:19 p.m. ET. This flare is classified as an M-class flare.

NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory caught this picture of a solar flare– as seen in the intense flash in the bottom left part of the image– on May 3, 2022. The image shows a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot product in flares and which is colorized in yellow. Credit: NASA.
The Sun gave off a strong solar flare on May 3, 2022, peaking at 9:25 a.m. EDT. NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured a picture of the occasion. This flare is categorized as an X-class flare. X-class signifies the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength.
Solar flares are powerful bursts of energy. Flares and solar eruptions can affect radio communications, electrical power grids, and navigation signals. They likewise posture risks to spacecraft and astronauts. More details on how flares are categorized can be found here.
This animation of the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveals it above the earth as it deals with towards the Sun. SDO is developed to help us comprehend the Suns influence in the world and Near-Earth space by studying the solar environment on small scales of space and time and in numerous wavelengths simultaneously. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab.
Please go to NOAAs Space Weather Prediction Center, the U.S. federal governments official source for area weather forecasts, watches, cautions, and notifies, to see how such space weather condition might affect Earth. NASA acts as the nations space weather condition research arm. NASA constantly monitors the Sun and our space environment with a network of spacecraft that investigate whatever from the Suns activity to the solar environment, in addition to the particles and electromagnetic fields in the space surrounding Earth.