November 30, 2022

Study of West Antarctica’s Deep Past Reinforces Vulnerability to Melting

Research Study of West Antarcticas Deep Past Reinforces Vulnerability to Melting

A brand-new research study examining the status of Antarcticas ice around 18 million to 16 million years ago suggests that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet contributed a lot more to sea-level increase events countless years back than previously believed.
The duration, referred to as the Early Miocene, saw both cold and warm durations. During warmer durations, sea level is thought to have risen by approximately 60 meters– the equivalent of melting all the ice currently on the Antarctic continent.
Nevertheless, the sea-level contributions of the substantial East Antarctic Ice Sheet and the smaller West Antarctic Ice Sheet doubted. Now, in a paper published today in the journal Nature, researchers from some 20 organizations have revealed that during cooler durations of the Miocene, the western ice sheet was bigger than previously thought. It was thought to be fairly small before 10 million years earlier, and sea-level rises were believed to be mainly the outcome of near-complete melting of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet throughout the hottest durations. Ice sheet designs clash with this concept; they recommend that parts of the eastern sheet stayed even throughout the warmest durations of the Miocene, when sea level increased the many. The brand-new study reconciles these models with the geologic records of sea levels.
Near the edge of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. (NASA/Nathan Kurtz).
Lead author Jim Marschalek of Imperial College London said, “Our observations from the previous help inform forecasts of how the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which is considered particularly susceptible to quick ice mass loss today, will respond under various future warming scenarios.”.
The research group, that included geochemists Sidney Hemming and Benjamin Keisling of Columbia Universitys Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, drilled into sediments in Antarcticas Ross Sea. In the cores, they recovered layers that represented the coldest and warmest durations of the Miocene. They discovered proof of material deposited by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet far out to sea, suggesting that it grew quite big throughout the coldest durations.
The scientists state this was possible due to the fact that more of the land surface underneath the western ice sheet was above sea level in the past, enabling more ice to sit on this part of the continent, compared to today. The study recommends that as a result, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet might raise sea level a significant quantity in the future as our world warms.
Scientists believe that the western sheet is today really susceptible to climatic and oceanic warming. The brand-new study supports that concept, showing it expanded and contracted substantially throughout the Miocene. The researchers say that now that the geological information agrees with the models, they can be more confident that the models are catching the action of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the past.
Coauthor Tina van de Flierdt of Imperial College stated, “While Antarctica is losing mass at an accelerating rate today, predicted water level rise by the end of this century is nowhere close to the levels that we understand existed in the geological past when temperature levels were one, 2, or three degrees warmer.”.
She stated that “the past is an important window to tell us what we are devoting the world to with certain quantities of warming. Fortunately is that the big ice sheets are reasonably slow to react to environmental change, so we might still have the ability to avoid significant ice loss in many areas. The problem is that the low-lying areas of the ice sheet have a tipping point, and we do not yet completely understand where this defining moment lies.”.
The group says future work is required to study in more information the susceptible low-lying parts of both the West Antarctic and East Antarctic ice sheets.
Adjusted from a press release by Imperial College London.

The sea-level contributions of the big East Antarctic Ice Sheet and the smaller West Antarctic Ice Sheet were uncertain. Ice sheet designs clash with this idea; they recommend that parts of the eastern sheet stayed even throughout the warmest durations of the Miocene, when sea level rose the a lot of. The scientists state this was possible because more of the land surface area underneath the western ice sheet was above sea level in the past, permitting more ice to sit on this part of the continent, compared to today. The research study recommends that as a result, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet could raise sea level a significant amount in the future as our world warms.
The great news is that the large ice sheets are relatively sluggish to respond to environmental modification, so we might still be able to prevent significant ice loss in lots of areas.

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