February 1, 2023

Research Shows 1 in 10 People May Still Be Infectious for COVID After 10 Days

The study, published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases found that 13 percent of people still showed clinically-relevant levels of infection after 10 days, indicating they might possibly still be transmittable. While they can tell if somebody has recently had the virus, they can not spot whether it is still active, and the person is transmittable. Lead author Merlin Davies, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: “In some settings, such as people returning to care houses after illness, People continuing to be contagious after 10 days could posture a serious public health threat. We may need to make sure people in those setting have a negative active infection test to ensure individuals are no longer contagious.

The study, released in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases found that 13 percent of people still showed clinically-relevant levels of infection after 10 days, implying they could possibly still be infectious. Some individuals kept these levels for approximately 68 days. The authors think this new test ought to be applied in settings where individuals are susceptible, to stop the spread of COVID-19.
Professor Lorna Harries, of the University of Exeter Medical School, supervised the study. She said: “While this is a reasonably small research study, our outcomes suggest that potentially active infection may often continue beyond a 10 day period, and might present a possible threat of onward transmission. There was nothing scientifically amazing about these people, which means we would not be able to predict who they are”.
Traditional PCR tests work by testing for the existence of viral fragments. While they can tell if somebody has recently had the infection, they can not detect whether it is still active, and the person is contagious. The test utilized in the current study nevertheless provides a positive outcome only when the virus is active and possibly capable of onward transmission.
Lead author Merlin Davies, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: “In some settings, such as people going back to care houses after health problem, People continuing to be contagious after ten days might pose a major public health risk. We may need to ensure people in those setting have a negative active virus test to ensure people are no longer transmittable. We now wish to conduct bigger trials to investigate this even more.”
Animal Free Research UK CEO, Carla Owen, stated: “The University of Exeter groups discovery is exciting and potentially extremely essential. Again, it shows how focusing exclusively on human biology throughout medical research can produce results that are more reputable and most likely to benefit human beings and animals..
” Pioneering animal totally free work is supplying the very best chance of not only defeating Covid 19 however likewise finding much better treatments for all human diseases.
” The results also send out a loud and clear message to the Government to better fund contemporary medical research study and make the UK a world leader in cutting edge, kinder science.”.
The research study is a collaboration between the University of Exeter Medical School, the Royal Devon & & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, and the NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility.
Referral: “Persistence of clinically-relevant levels of SARS-CoV2 envelope gene subgenomic RNAs in non-immunocompromised individuals” by Merlin Davies, Laura R Bramwell, Nicola Jeffery, Ben Bunce, Ben P Lee, Bridget Knight, Cressida Auckland, Jane AH Masoli and Lorna W Harries, 7 December 2021, International Journal of Infectious Diseases.DOI: 10.1016/ j.ijid.2021.12.312.

The SARS-CoV-2 virus under a microscopic lense. Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
One in 10 individuals might have clinically pertinent levels of possibly transmittable SARS-CoV-2 past the 10 day quarantine duration, according to brand-new research study.
One in 10 individuals may have clinically relevant levels of possibly infectious SARS-CoV-2 past the 10 day quarantine duration, according to brand-new research study.
The study, led by the University of Exeter and funded by Animal Free Research UK, utilized a newly adapted test which can find whether the infection was potentially still active. It was applied to samples from 176 individuals in Exeter who had actually tested positive on standard PCR tests.

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