June 19, 2024

New Materials Synthesized for Extremely High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells

KTU synthesized products were used in solar mini-modules
KTU chemists, together with scientists from science centers in China, Italy, Lithuania, Switzerland, and Luxembourg, substantially improved the stability of perovskite solar cells using the passivation technique. The perovskite surface area ends up being chemically non-active during passivation, therefore getting rid of perovskite flaws that happen throughout manufacture. The occurring perovskite solar batteries achieve a performance of 23.9 percent with long-term functional stability (over 1000 h).
Dr. Kasparas Rakstys, Head of the research group at the KTU Faculty of Chemical Technology. Credit: KTU
” Passivation has been used formerly, but so far, a two-dimensional (2D) layer of perovskite is being formed on the standard three-dimensional (3D) perovskite light absorber, making it tough for carriers to move, especially at higher temperatures. It is important to avoid this since the solar cells end up being hot,” says co-author of the creation, KTU chief researcher Dr. Kasparas Rakštys.
To address this issue, a worldwide team of researchers conducted a study that approximated the minimum energy required to form 2D perovskites. The surface of the 3D perovskite layer was passivated by different isomers of phenylethylammonium iodide manufactured by KTU. These isomers have the same molecular formula but various plans of atoms in space, figuring out the likelihood of 2D perovskite development.
Scientists from the Lausanne Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Switzerland checked the products in perovskite solar mini-modules with an active location over 300 times bigger than normal, laboratory-scale perovskite solar batteries. These mini-modules accomplished a record solar power conversion performance of 21.4 percent. The surface area of the perovskite layer of the record-breaking mini-solar modules was coated with materials developed by KTU chemists.
” The research study proved to be rather efficient in avoiding the negative results of passivation on solar batteries. It has actually been found that an isomer with the passivation groups closest to each other causes the most efficient passivation due to the steric obstacle that avoids 2D perovskite development. Interestingly, steric hindrance is likewise used as a tool in different locations of chemistry to prevent or slow down unwanted reactions,” says the KTU researcher.
The creation appeared in one of the most prestigious journals
The research study was released in Nature Communications, among the worlds most respected clinical journals.
At the moment, KTU scientists are working with colleagues from other countries to produce practical, hole-transporting materials and brand-new perovskite structures. According to Dr. Rakštys: “International cooperation in science is crucial because it is impossible to cover all the locations as chemistry, physics, and materials science working in such interdisciplinary field.”
After graduating with MSc in Applied Chemistry from KTU, Dr. Rakštys earned his PhD in EPFL, Switzerland, and later on continued as a postdoctoral researcher in UQ, Australia. Today he is working at KTU.
” After investing over 6 years in prestigious foreign research organizations, I chose to understand my scientific concepts in Lithuania, and thus contribute to the effective development and popularisation of science in Lithuania. I believe that working in your own nation can provide more meaning, motivation, and self-realization. The financial backing offered by the MJJ Foundation has contributed substantially to this choice,” says Dr. Rakštys.
Scientists at KTU manufacture, test, and objective to use brand-new materials for the production of more efficient and steady solar cells.
” This is a very enticing area due to the fact that perovskite solar batteries are presently among the fastest-growing innovations, and their successful commercialization might contribute to climate modification services,” states Dr. Rakštys.
This is not the very first time that KTU researchers have actually set a world record in solar technologies. KTU chemists, together with physicists at Berlins Helmholtz-Zentrum (HZB) Research Institute in Berlin, have actually improved the performance of tandem silicon-perovskite solar cells, which now stands at 29.8 percent. It is a world record for this kind of solar component.
Recommendation: “Tuning structural isomers of phenylenediammonium to pay for steady and efficient perovskite solar batteries and modules” by Cheng Liu, Yi Yang, Kasparas Rakstys, Arup Mahata, Marius Franckevicius, Edoardo Mosconi, Raminta Skackauskaite, Bin Ding, Keith G. Brooks, Onovbaramwen Jennifer Usiobo, Jean-Nicolas Audinot, Hiroyuki Kanda, Simonas Driukas, Gabriele Kavaliauskaite, Vidmantas Gulbinas, Marc Dessimoz, Vytautas Getautis, Filippo De Angelis, Yong Ding, Songyuan Dai, Paul J. Dyson and Mohammad Khaja Nazeeruddin, 4 November 2021, Nature Communications.DOI: 10.1038/ s41467-021-26754-2.

KTU chemists, together with researchers from science centers in China, Italy, Lithuania, Switzerland, and Luxembourg, considerably improved the stability of perovskite solar cells using the passivation method. The perovskite surface ends up being chemically non-active during passivation, thus getting rid of perovskite problems that occur during manufacture. The surface of the 3D perovskite layer was passivated by different isomers of phenylethylammonium iodide manufactured by KTU. Researchers from the Lausanne Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Switzerland checked the materials in perovskite solar mini-modules with an active location over 300 times bigger than normal, laboratory-scale perovskite solar cells. The surface of the perovskite layer of the record-breaking mini-solar modules was coated with materials established by KTU chemists.

The materials established at KTU were tested in the laboratories of Lausanne Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Switzerland. Credit: KTU
A group of chemists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania manufactured products that were used for building a record-breaking perovskite solar module, with an effectiveness of 21.4 percent. This was attained through the passivation of the active solar battery layer, which increases the performance of the cell and considerably improves its stability.
Perovskite solar batteries (PSCs) are one of the worlds fastest-growing solar battery innovations. These elements are thin-layered, light-weight, versatile, and are made from affordable materials. However, this type of solar battery still faces a major problem: fast destruction of perovskite material under ecological conditions.
Passivation is a efficient however simple way to enhance the stability of perovskite solar cells and has been considered as one of the most efficient strategies for getting rid of the defects of perovskite materials and their negative results. The passivated perovskite surface area becomes more resistant to ambient conditions as temperature or humidity, and more steady, extending the sturdiness of the gadget.