October 5, 2022

An Expanse of Light – Dazzling New Multiwavelength Images of the Universe From NASA

A brand-new gallery of images combining X-ray data from Chandra with those from other telescopes is being launched.
The objects range from a supernova residue within the Milky Way to a galaxy cluster countless light years away.
The layers of data are colored in each image to boost different functions.
This is a presentation of how brand-new telescopes like JWST and IXPE will deal with other observatories to explore deep space.

NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center manages the Chandra program. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatorys Chandra X-ray Center controls science operations from Cambridge, Massachusetts, and flight operations from Burlington, Massachusetts.

This gallery offers examples of the methods that various kinds of light from telescopes on the ground and in space can be integrated. The typical thread in each of these choices is information from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory, showing how X-rays– which are emitted by energetic and extremely hot processes– are found throughout deep space.
R Aquarii Composite. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI, Palomar Observatory, DSS; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; H-Alpha: LCO/IMACS/MMTF
R Aquarii
This things is, in reality, a pair: a white dwarf star that steadily burns at a relatively cool temperature level and a highly variable red giant. As they orbit each other, the white dwarf pulls product from the red giant onto its surface. Over time, enough of this material collects and activates a surge. Astronomers have seen such outbursts over recent years. Evidence for much older outbursts is seen in the spectacular structures observed by NASAs Hubble Space Telescope (red and blue). X-ray data from Chandra (purple) demonstrates how a jet from the white dwarf stands out material surrounding it and developing shock waves, similar to sonic booms from supersonic airplanes.
Cassiopeia A Composite. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI, Palomar Observatory, DSS; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; H-Alpha: LCO/IMACS/MMTF
In this image, X-rays reveal silicon (red), sulfur (yellow), calcium (green), and iron (light purple). Like X-rays, radio waves can penetrate thick clouds of gas and dust that lie between Earth and Cassiopeia A, providing additional info about this well-known excellent surge.
Guitar Nebula Composite. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI, Palomar Observatory, DSS; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; H-Alpha: LCO/IMACS/MMTF.
Guitar Nebula.
For the last years or two, astronomers have actually been puzzled by the positioning of some jets of X-rays coming from extremely fast-moving pulsars (that is, spinning neutron stars) that shoot out into interstellar area at odd, unanticipated angles. This is what astronomers see with PSR B2224 +65, a pulsar discovered near the structure nicknamed the “Guitar Nebula” due to its shape in optical light (blue). An X-ray stream (pink) caught by Chandra is pointed nearly perpendicular to the guitar-shaped structure, stemming from the magnetic poles of the pulsar.
Abell 2597 Composite. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI, Palomar Observatory, DSS; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; H-Alpha: LCO/IMACS/MMTF.
Abell 2597.
Galaxy clusters, the biggest structures in the universe held together by gravity, are vibrant environments including private galaxies and huge quantities of hot gas and dark matter. This composite image of Abell 2597 consists of X-rays from Chandra (blue), optical information from the Digitized Sky Survey (orange), and emission from hydrogen atoms in optical light from the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile (red).
NGC 4490 Composite. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI, Palomar Observatory, DSS; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; H-Alpha: LCO/IMACS/MMTF.
NGC 4490.
Some of the point-like sources of X-rays represent stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars within the galaxy. In this image of NGC 4490, X-rays from Chandra (purple) have actually been combined with an optical image from Hubble (red, green, and blue).

Each image consists of X-rays from Chandra in combination with information from other telescopes that capture different types of light. These images show how X-rays– colored differently in each image– are given off by extremely hot and energetic items throughout the universe. In this image, X-rays reveal silicon (red), sulfur (yellow), calcium (green), and iron (light purple). Some of the point-like sources of X-rays represent stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars within the galaxy. In this image of NGC 4490, X-rays from Chandra (purple) have been combined with an optical image from Hubble (red, green, and blue).

Each image consists of X-rays from Chandra in mix with data from other telescopes that capture different types of light. These images show how X-rays– colored differently in each image– are given off by energetic and extremely hot objects throughout the universe.
The current launches of the James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) and the Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) by NASA and its international partners are exceptional suggestions that the universe discharges light or energy in many different kinds. To completely examine cosmic objects and phenomena, researchers need telescopes that can identify light throughout what is known as the electromagnetic spectrum.

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