February 26, 2024

Artemis I Wet Dress Rehearsal Countdown Ended – Here’s What Went Wrong

By NASA
April 4, 2022

NASAs Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is seen atop a mobile launcher at Launch Complex 39B, Monday, April 4, 2022, as the Artemis I introduce group carries out the damp dress wedding rehearsal test at NASAs Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Ahead of NASAs Artemis I flight test, the damp dress rehearsal will run the Artemis I release team through operations to fill propellant, carry out a complete launch countdown, show the ability to recycle the countdown clock, and drain the tanks to practice timelines and procedures for launch. Offered the time to resolve the issue as groups were nearing the end of their shifts, the launch director made the call to stop the test for the day.

The wet dress wedding rehearsal is the last major test before launch. This test allows the group to practice propellant loading and thoroughly have a look at the Artemis I rocket systems as they are exposed to cryogenics.

NASAs Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is seen atop a mobile launcher at Launch Complex 39B, Monday, April 4, 2022, as the Artemis I release group carries out the wet dress practice session test at NASAs Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Ahead of NASAs Artemis I flight test, the wet dress rehearsal will run the Artemis I release team through operations to load propellant, carry out a full launch countdown, demonstrate the capability to recycle the countdown clock, and drain pipes the tanks to practice timelines and procedures for launch. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
The Artemis I team has actually ended todays effort at the wet gown rehearsal test at 5 p.m. The countdown ended after partially loading liquid oxygen into the Space Launch System core phase tank. This supplied the teams a valuable chance for training and to make sure modeled packing treatments were precise. This was the very first time using brand-new systems at NASAs Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39B. The team had the ability to keep an eye on the Artemis I core stage as it was exposed to cryogenic liquids and collect information that will inform updates to propellant loading procedures.
After troubleshooting a temperature level limitation issue for the liquid oxygen, which postponed the countdown by a number of hours, the group successfully developed a new treatment for packing the liquid oxygen and filled the tank to 50 percent. Liquid oxygen is an exceptionally cold, or cryogenic, propellant that is kept at minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit.
Throughout chilldown of the lines in preparation for packing the liquid hydrogen, the groups encountered an issue with a panel on the mobile launcher that manages the core stage vent valve. Given the time to solve the problem as teams were nearing the end of their shifts, the launch director made the call to stop the test for the day.