September 29, 2023

NASA Transfers Landsat 9 Satellite to USGS – Provides Global Coverage of Landscape Changes on Earth

Illustration of the Landsat 9 spacecraft in orbit around Earth, passing over the US from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. Landsat 9 will image a swath 185 km (115 miles) in width and complete about 14 orbits each day, consequently imaging every part of Earth every 16 days. NASA launched Landsat 9 from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California on September 27, 2021. Landsat 9 joined Landsat 8, which has been orbiting considering that 2013. An average of 740 Landsat 9 scenes are gathered by USGS professionals every day from around the world to be processed and archived at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls.

NASA launched Landsat 9 from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California on September 27, 2021. Considering that then, NASA mission engineers and researchers, with USGS cooperation, have been putting the satellite through its speeds. This included steering it into its orbit, calibrating the detectors, and gathering test images. Now completely mission-certified, the satellite is under USGS functional control for the remainder of its mission life.
A count down of 9 aspects of the Landsat objective, the science, the innovation, and individuals who continue its tradition. Credit: NASAs Goddard Space Flight
” Our partnership with NASA over several years has been excellent for science and great for the American individuals,” stated Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Tanya Trujillo. “A half-century archive of Landsats Earth observations is a spectacular achievement in the history of science. This fifty-year record offers scientists a constant baseline that can be utilized to track climate modification and allows them to see modifications to the land that might not otherwise be noticed.”
Landsat 9 signed up with Landsat 8, which has been orbiting since 2013. Together, the 2 satellites collect pictures of Earths complete surface area every 8 days. An average of 740 Landsat 9 scenes are gathered by USGS professionals every day from around the world to be processed and archived at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls.
Video revealing Landsat 8 and Landsat 9 constellation and paths utilized for Earth imaging. Credit: NASA
Remote-sensing satellites such as Landsat aid scientists observe the world using varieties of light beyond the power of human sight. This enables for keeping track of land changes that may have human or natural causes. Landsat is special since it consistently catches a thorough view of Earth at a moderate resolution of roughly 30 meters (98 feet), the area of a baseball infield. This worldwide view of modifications on the land through decades supplies an unparalleled perspective for a broad variety of information applications in fields such as agriculture, water management, forestry, disaster reaction, and– most importantly– environment modification science.
Landsat offers billions of dollars in value to the U.S. economy each year, according to quotes. Landsat data and images appeared to the general public at no charge starting in 2008. This policy has served to expand applications of Landsat data that enable higher efficiencies for government firms while developing successful business chances for information service industries.
With an information user community that keeps growing, scientists and engineers are currently anticipating the next mission. NASA and USGS are establishing alternatives for the next model of Landsat, presently called Landsat Next.
The Landsat program has actually provided constant worldwide protection of landscape change given that 1972. Landsats unequaled long-term data record offers the basis for an important understanding of environmental and environment changes occurring in the United States and around the globe.

Illustration of the Landsat 9 spacecraft in orbit around Earth, passing over the US from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. The satellite will travel at 7.5 km/second, circling around the globe every 99 minutes at an altitude of 705 km (438 miles). Landsat 9 will image a swath 185 km (115 miles) in width and total about 14 orbits each day, thus imaging every part of Earth every 16 days. Credit: NASA
On August 11, NASA moved ownership and operational control of the Landsat 9 satellite to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in an event in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
Landsat 9 is the latest in the Landsat series of remote-sensing satellites, which offer worldwide coverage of landscape modifications on Earth. The Landsat program– a joint effort in between NASA and USGS– is a long-running task that recently marked 50 years of constant service on July 23.
” For more than fifty years now, Landsat satellites have actually helped us discover more about how Earth systems work, how human activities impact those systems, and how we can make better choices for the future,” stated NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “Landsat 9, the most recent joint effort by NASA and USGS, proudly continues that remarkable record.”