March 5, 2024

Scientists Uncover a Surprising Connection Between Appetite and Sun Exposure

The study found that sun direct exposure triggers a protein that promotes the hunger.
Going to the beach? Going on a walking? Be prepared: Men will be hungrier!
According to recent research from Tel Aviv University, exposure to the sun makes men more starving however not ladies. The research, which was performed using laboratory models, reveals how the metabolic mechanism is activated differently in females and males. According to the scientists, sun exposure in males of both animal types and humans sets off a protein called p53 to fix any DNA damage that may have been done to the skin as a result of the direct exposure.
Teacher Carmit Levy. Credit: Tel Aviv University
Ghrelin, a hormone that increases cravings, is produced by the body in response to the activation of p53. The hormonal agent estrogen avoids the interaction of p53 with ghrelin in women, which avoids the desire to consume after direct exposure to the sun.
Teacher Carmit Levy and Ph.D. trainee Shivang Parikh of the Department of Human Genetics and Biochemistry at TAUs Sackler Faculty of Medicine led the groundbreaking research study. It was performed in collaboration with many Israeli and worldwide scientists, consisting of Tel Aviv Sourasky (Ichilov), Assuta, Meir, and Sheba Medical Centers, as well as Dr. Yiftach Gepner and Dr. Lior Bikovski from TAUs Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Professor Aron Weller from Bar-Ilan University. The study was released in the popular journal Nature Metabolism.

The research studys epidemiological information, which included self-reports from trainees who had hung around in the sun, were gathered over the course of a yearlong study of about 3,000 Israelis of both sexes about their consuming routines. This data was integrated with the findings of a genetic study carried out in a lab model. The results show that both in laboratory models and in people, the skin is a crucial regulator of energy and cravings (metabolic process).
The researchers explain that there is a significant metabolic difference between females and guys, affecting both their health and their behavior. However, so far it has actually not been developed whether the two genders respond in a different way to ecological triggers such as exposures to the suns UV radiation.
Teacher Levy: “We analyzed the distinctions in between males and females after sun exposure and discovered that males eat more than females since their cravings has increased. Our study was the first gender-dependent medical study ever carried out on UV exposure, and for the first time, the molecular connection between UV direct exposure and cravings was figured out. Gender-dependent medical studies are particularly complicated considering that twice the number of individuals are required in order to find statistically substantial distinctions.”
The protein p53, discovered in the skin, repair work damage to the DNA triggered by sun exposure, however it does more than that. It signifies to our bodies that winter season is over, and we are out in the sun, possibly in preparation for the breeding season.
Reference: “Food-seeking habits is set off by skin ultraviolet exposure in males” by Shivang Parikh, Roma Parikh, Keren Michael, Lior Bikovski, Georgina Barnabas, Mariya Mardamshina, Rina Hemi, Paulee Manich, Nir Goldstein, Hagar Malcov-Brog, Tom Ben-Dov, Ohad Glaich, Daphna Liber, Yael Bornstein, Koral Goltseker, Roy Ben-Bezalel, Mor Pavlovsky, Tamar Golan, Liron Spitzer, Hagit Matz, Pinchas Gonen, Ruth Percik, Lior Leibou, Tomer Perluk, Gil Ast, Jacob Frand, Ronen Brenner, Tamar Ziv, Mehdi Khaled, Shamgar Ben-Eliyahu, Segev Barak, Orit Karnieli-Miller, Eran Levin, Yftach Gepner, Ram Weiss, Paul Pfluger, Aron Weller and Carmit Levy, 11 July 2022, Nature Metabolism.DOI: 10.1038/ s42255-022-00587-9.

According to current research study from Tel Aviv University, direct exposure to the sun makes guys more hungry but not females. According to the scientists, sun direct exposure in males of both animal species and people activates a protein called p53 to fix any DNA damage that may have been done to the skin as an outcome of the direct exposure.
Professor Levy: “We analyzed the differences between males and women after sun exposure and discovered that guys eat more than women since their hunger has actually increased. Our research study was the very first gender-dependent medical study ever carried out on UV exposure, and for the first time, the molecular connection between UV direct exposure and cravings was understood. The protein p53, discovered in the skin, repairs damage to the DNA triggered by sun exposure, however it does more than that.