June 16, 2024

Artemis Mission Teams Select Orion Capsule Landing Site and Prepare for Splashdown

The objective management group fulfilled with the entry flight director and NASA healing director as the planned splashdown of Orion Sunday, December 11 is now about 72 hours away. On December 8, NASA specialists will sneak peek the upcoming entry, descent, and splashdown of the Orion spacecraft, which will conclude the Artemis I mission. Earths atmosphere at first will slow the spacecraft to 325 miles per hour (525 km/h), then the parachutes will slow Orion to a splashdown speed in about 10 minutes as it comes down through Earths atmosphere. Those 116-foot-diameter (35-meter-diameter) parachutes of nylon broadcloth, or “silk,” will slow the Orion team module to a splashdown speed of 20 miles per hour (32 km/h) or less.
Discover more about Orions parachute system in the Artemis I reference guide.

NASA evaluated Orions team module uprighting system off the Coast of North Carolina in March 2018. Credit: NASA
On flight day 23 of NASAs Artemis I objective, the Orion spacecraft continues making the return journey to Earth, capturing images and video along the method.
” At present, we are on track to have a fully successful objective with some bonus objectives that weve accomplished along the way,” stated Mike Sarafin, Artemis I objective supervisor. “On entry day, we will recognize our top priority one goal, which is to show the car at lunar re-entry conditions, as well as our concern three objective, which is to recover the spacecraft.”
The mission management group fulfilled with the entry flight director and NASA healing director as the planned splashdown of Orion Sunday, December 11 is now about 72 hours away. They decided and evaluated the weather on a landing website in the Pacific Ocean near Guadalupe Island, south of the primary landing location. See the reentry sneak peek instruction (video embedded listed below) for more information.

On December 8, NASA specialists will sneak peek the upcoming entry, descent, and splashdown of the Orion spacecraft, which will conclude the Artemis I objective. After 25.5 days in area, Orion is anticipated to splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of San Diego at 12:40 p.m. EST (17:40 UTC) on Sunday, Dec. 11. The exploration ground systems recovery group from NASAs Kennedy Space Center in Florida, dealing with the U.S. Navy, will recover the spacecraft. Live coverage for this event starts at 11 a.m. EST (16:00 UTC).
Later last night, flight controllers performed a last study of Orions team module and service module using cameras on each of the spacecrafts four solar selections. Throughout the team module assessment, flight controllers take a look at the back shell made up of 1,300 thermal security system tiles which will safeguard the spacecraft from the cold of area and the extreme heat of re-entry.
Simply prior to re-entry, the team module and service module will separate and only the crew module will go back to Earth while the service module burns up in Earths atmosphere upon re-entry over the Pacific Ocean. The Artemis I trajectory is developed to guarantee any remaining parts do not position a threat to land, individuals, or shipping lanes.
The Moon appears smaller from Orions viewpoint on flight day 22 as the Artemis I spacecraft continues distancing itself from our lunar next-door neighbor, over 125,000 miles away in this image. Credit: NASA
After separating from the service module, the team module will prepare to perform a skip entry method that makes it possible for the spacecraft to precisely and regularly splash down at the selected landing website. Orion will dip into the upper part of Earths atmosphere and usage that environment, together with the lift of the capsule, to avoid back out of the atmosphere, then reenter for last descent under parachutes and crash. This technique will enable a safe re-entry for future Artemis objectives despite when and where they return from the Moon.
Earths atmosphere initially will slow the spacecraft to 325 miles per hour (525 km/h), then the parachutes will slow Orion to a splashdown speed in about 10 minutes as it descends through Earths environment. Parachute release begins at an altitude of about 5 miles with three small parachutes pulling the forward bay covers away. As soon as the forward bay cover separates, two drogue parachutes will stabilize the team and slow module for main parachute deployment. At an elevation of 9,500 feet (2,900 meters) and a spacecraft speed of 130 miles per hour (210 km/h), three pilot parachutes will lift and deploy the primary parachutes. Those 116-foot-diameter (35-meter-diameter) parachutes of nylon broadcloth, or “silk,” will slow the Orion crew module to a splashdown speed of 20 mph (32 km/h) or less.
Orion continues its journey house to Earth, which appears here as a crescent, still 234,000 miles away. The Artemis I spacecraft is scheduled to crash in the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, December 11.
The parachute system includes 11 parachutes made from 36,000 square feet (3,300 square meters) of canopy material. The canopy is attached to the top of the spacecraft with more than 13 miles of Kevlar lines that are deployed in series utilizing cannon-like mortars and pyrotechnic thrusters and bolt cutters. Discover more about Orions parachute system in the Artemis I reference guide.
NASA TV coverage of Artemis Is return to Earth begins at 11 a.m. EST on Sunday, December 11. The Orion spacecraft is arranged to crash in the Pacific Ocean at 12:40 p.m. near Guadalupe Island.
Prior to 6:00 p.m. CST on December 8, Orion was taking a trip 207,200 miles (333,456 km) from Earth and 180,400 miles from the Moon, cruising at 1,415 mph (2,277 km/h).
Orion released aboard the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at 1:47 am EST (6:47 UTC) on November 16 from historical Launch Complex 39B at NASAs Kennedy Space Center.
The Artemis I objective is the first incorporated test of NASAs deep area exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, the SLS rocket, and Kennedy Space Centers Exploration Ground Systems.