May 20, 2024

Christmas myths: the Yule Cat

The Yule Cat (or Christmas cat) is a legendary animal from Icelandic folklore. According to myth, the Yule cat is a big, vicious feline that strolls the land throughout the Christmas season looking for people to consume. Heres the thing, though: if you didnt have new clothes for Christmas, the feared Yule Cat would come out and eat you– and this was no common feline.
The Yule Cat is associated with a number of other dark Christmas misconceptions in Norse (and particularly Icelandic) folklore. If you want to be safe on Christmas, from both the giantess and the Yule Cat, the finest thing to do is to be honest and true over the year, and make sure you offer gifts to your loved ones.

The story came from as a work incentive. In Iceland, processing wool was among the crucial activities, and individuals wanted a reward for workers to complete processing the fall wool before Christmas. The ones who participated in the work would be rewarded with brand-new clothes, however those who did not would get absolutely nothing and thus be preyed upon by the monstrous cat.
In other analyses, the Yule feline doesnt consume the individuals, just their food and provides– which still sounds like a nasty animal. You do not necessarily have to use new clothes yourself– if you talented new clothes to the less lucky, the Yule feline will leave you alone.
Its still traditional in Iceland to provide kids a little something new to use prior to Christmas “so that the Christmas feline doesnt get you”– although many people dont really think in its actual presence– but its much better to be safe than sorry.
The Yule Cat is associated with numerous other dark Christmas myths in Norse (and specifically Icelandic) folklore. If you want to be safe on Christmas, from both the giantess and the Yule Cat, the finest thing to do is to be honest and real over the year, and make sure you provide gifts to your loved ones.
Here is a popular poem by Jóhannes úr Kötlum, one of Icelands a lot of beloved poets, explaining the beast:
You understand the Christmas feline– that feline is extremely largeWe dont know where he came fromnor where he has goneHe opened his eyes widelyglowing both of themit was not for cowardsto check out themHis hair sharp as needleshis back was bulgy and high and claws on his hairy pawwere not a pretty sightTherefore the women competedto rock and sow and spinand knitted colorful clothesor one little sockFor the feline could not comeand get the little childrenthey had to get new clothesfrom the grownupsWhen christmas eve was lightedand the cat looked insidethe kids stood straight and red-cheekedwith their presentsHe waved his strong tailhe leapt, scratched and blewand was either in the valleyor out on the headlandHe perambulated, starving and meanin hurtfully cold christmas snowand kindled the hearts with fearin every townIf outside one heard a weak “meaow”then unluck made certain to happenall understood he hunted menand didnt desire miceHe followed the poorer peoplewho didnt get any new clothingnear christmas– and attempted and livedin poorest conditionsFrom them he took at the very same timeall their christmas foodand consumed them also themselvesif he couldTherefore the females competedto rock and sow and spinand knitted colorful clothesor one little sock Some had gotten an apronand some had actually got a brand-new shoeor anything that was needfulbut that was enoughFor pussy should not eat no-onewho got some brand-new piece of clothesShe hissed with her unsightly voiceand ran awayIf she still exists I do not knowbut for absolutely nothing would be his tripif everybody would get next christmassome brand-new ragYou may want to keep it in mindto help if there is needfor someplace there might be childrenwho get nothing at allMayhaps that looking for those who sufferfrom absence of abundant lightswill give you a delighted seasonand merry christmas.

A lot of Christmas traditions are nice and benign; after all,t is the season to be jolly! Nevertheless, in the Norse lands, and Iceland in, stories follow a various line.
The Yule Cat (or Christmas cat) is a legendary animal from Icelandic folklore. According to myth, the Yule cat is a big, vicious feline that roams the land during the Christmas season looking for people to eat.

Each culture has its own Christmas traditions, misconceptions, and stories. What about a giant cat that consumes you if you dont have brand-new clothing? Meet Jólakötturin– the Yule Cat.

The Yule Cat pic.twitter.com/huCMFKzXE6
— Lee James McKnight (@LeeJMcKnight) November 25, 2021

The story of the Jólakötturinn, the Yule Cat, originated eventually throughout the Dark Ages, though the oldest written accounts are from the 19th century. The story goes like this:
In Medieval Iceland, companies rewarded their employees and members of their households with new clothes and sheepskin shoes. The presents were made as a benefit for a year of difficult work and as an incentive to finish the work prior to Christmas– particularly processing the autumn wool. Heres the thing, though: if you didnt have brand-new clothing for Christmas, the dreaded Yule Cat would come out and eat you– and this was no ordinary feline.
It towers above the highest structures, prancing around Iceland searching for people without brand-new clothes. It especially looks for kids and checks them to see if they have brand-new garments. The unfortunate kids might simply end up on the menu of the Yule Cat if they were too lazy to earn them.