May 20, 2024

Preventing Dementia and Cognitive Impairment: The Powerful Benefits of More Steps and Moderate Exercise

Andrea LaCroix, Ph.D., M.P.H., Distinguished Professor at the UC San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science. Credit: University of California San Diego
While there are several types, dementias are incapacitating neurological conditions that can trigger loss of memory, the ability to think, issue resolve or factor. Moderate cognitive disability is an early phase of amnesia or believing problems that is not as extreme as dementia.
According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, dementia impacts more than 5 million people in this nation. That number is expected to double by 2050.
More ladies live with and are at greater risk of establishing dementia than males.
” Physical activity has actually been identified as one of the three most promising ways to lower the risk of dementia and Alzheimers illness. Avoidance is very important because as soon as dementia is detected, it is very difficult to slow or reverse. There is no remedy,” stated LaCroix.
Due to the fact that few large research studies have analyzed device steps of motion and sitting in relation to moderate cognitive problems and dementia, much of the released research study on the associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with cognitive decline and dementia is based on self-reported steps, said first author, Steven Nguyen, Ph.D., M.P.H., a postdoctoral scholar at the Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health.
Steven Nguyen, Ph.D., M.P.H., a postdoctoral scholar at the UC San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science Credit: University of California San Diego.
For this study, the researchers tested information from 1,277 ladies as part of two Womens Health Initiative (WHI) ancillary studies– the WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) and the Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health (OPACH) study. The ladies went and used research-grade accelerometers about their everyday activities for as much as 7 days to acquire precise steps of exercise and sitting.
The activity trackers showed the women balanced 3,216 actions, 276 minutes in light physical activities, 45.5 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise, and 10.5 hours of sitting daily. Examples of light physical activity might consist of housework, gardening, or walking. Moderate-to-vigorous exercise might consist of vigorous walking.
The study findings also revealed that greater amounts of sitting and extended sitting were not connected with a higher risk of mild cognitive problems or dementia.
Effect of physical activity on dementia graphic. Credit: UC San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science.
Together, this details has public and clinical health value as there is little published information on the amount and strength of physical activity required for a lower dementia risk said Nguyen.
” Older adults can be motivated to increase the motion of a minimum of moderate strength and take more actions every day for a lower risk of mild cognitive disability and dementia,” stated Nguyen.
” The findings for actions each day are particularly noteworthy because steps are recorded by a range of wearable devices increasingly used by individuals and might be readily adopted.”
The authors said further research study is needed among large varied populations that consist of males.
Reference: “Accelerometer-measured exercise and sitting with occurrence moderate cognitive problems or possible dementia among older females” by Steve Nguyen, Andrea Z. LaCroix, Kathleen M. Hayden, Chongzhi Di, Priya Palta, Marcia L. Stefanick, JoAnn E. Manson, Stephen R. Rapp, Michael J. LaMonte and John Bellettiere, 25 January 2023, Alzheimers & & Dementia.DOI: 10.1002/ alz.12908.
The research study was funded, in part, by the National Institute on Aging and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The Womens Health Initiative was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Dementia is a progressive brain condition that affects memory, believing, habits, and the ability to perform daily tasks. Dementia often starts with moderate memory loss and slowly aggravates over time, impacting an individuals quality of life and their ability to live independently.
They reported that among women 65 years or older, each extra 31 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day was linked to a 21% lower danger of developing mild cognitive problems or dementia.” Physical activity has actually been determined as one of the 3 most appealing methods to minimize the risk of dementia and Alzheimers illness. Avoidance is essential due to the fact that once dementia is diagnosed, it is very difficult to slow or reverse.

Dementia is a progressive brain disorder that affects memory, believing, behavior, and the ability to perform everyday jobs. It is a group of signs that can be triggered by different hidden conditions, including Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, and Huntingtons disease. Dementia frequently starts with moderate amnesia and slowly aggravates with time, affecting an individuals quality of life and their ability to live separately.
According to a brand-new study led by the Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at the University of California San Diego, older females who participate in more daily walking and moderate-to-vigorous exercise have a lower likelihood of developing moderate cognitive disability or dementia.
The team just recently released their findings in Alzheimers & & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimers Association. They reported that among ladies 65 years or older, each extra 31 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity each day was connected to a 21% lower threat of establishing mild cognitive problems or dementia. Furthermore, each extra 1,865 everyday steps was associated with a 33% lower danger.
” Given that the beginning of dementia starts 20 years or more before symptoms show, the early intervention for delaying or avoiding cognitive decrease and dementia among older adults is necessary,” stated senior author Andrea LaCroix, Ph.D., M.P.H., Distinguished Professor at the Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at UC San Diego