February 26, 2024

Brain-Busting Diets: Why a High-Fat Diet Could Reduce Your Brain’s Ability To Regulate Food Consumption

Photographs of rat brainstem in control diet plan conditions (upper) and after 3 days of high-fat diet plan feeding (lower) showing the increase in astrocyte (GFAP; green) staining. High-magnification images are shown below for the control diet (left) and high-fat diet (right). Credit: Courtney Clyburn et al., 10.1113/ JP283566.
We found that a brief exposure (3 to five days) of a high fat/calorie diet plan has the biggest result on astrocytes, activating the typical signaling path to control the stomach. Around 10-14 days of consuming a high fat/calorie diet, astrocytes seem to fail to react and the brains capability to regulate calorie intake appears to be lost.
Astrocytes at first react when high-fat/calorie food is ingested. Their activation triggers the release of gliotransmitters, chemicals (consisting of glutamate and ATP) that delight nerve cells and allow typical signaling pathways to promote nerve cells that control how the stomach works. This ensures the stomach agreements correctly to fill and clear in response to food going through the digestion system. The waterfall is interrupted when astrocytes are inhibited. Because the stomach does not fill and empty appropriately, the reduction in signaling chemicals leads to a hold-up in food digestion.
The energetic examination utilized behavioral observation to monitor food consumption in rats (N= 205, 133 males, 72 women) which were fed a control or high fat/calorie diet for one, 3, five, or 14 days. This was integrated with specialist and pharmacological genetic techniques (both in vivo and in vitro) to target unique neural circuits. Making it possible for the researchers to specifically hinder astrocytes in a particular area of the brainstem (the posterior part of the brain that connects the brain to the back cable), so they could examine how specific neurons acted to studying rats behavior when awake.
Human research studies will need to be performed to verify if the same mechanism takes place in humans. If this is the case, further screening will be needed to evaluate if the mechanism might be securely targeted without interrupting other neural paths.
The scientists have strategies to more check out the mechanism.
Dr. Kirsteen Browning stated, “We have yet to discover whether the loss of astrocyte activity and the signaling mechanism is the cause of overeating or that it happens in reaction to the overindulging. We aspire to discover whether it is possible to reactivate the brains evident lost ability to regulate calorie consumption. If this is the case, it could cause interventions to assist bring back calorie guideline in people.”.
Reference: “Brainstem astrocytes manage homeostatic guideline of calorie consumption” by Courtney Clyburn, Kaitlin E. Carson, Caleb R. Smith, R. Alberto Travagli and Kirsteen N. Browning, 25 January 2023, The Journal of Physiology.DOI: 10.1113/ JP283566.

The Penn State College of Medicine scientists recommend that astrocytes (big star-shaped cells in the brain that control lots of different functions of nerve cells in the brain) control short-term calorie consumption. Pictures of rat brainstem in control diet conditions (upper) and after 3 days of high-fat diet plan feeding (lower) showing the increase in astrocyte (GFAP; green) staining. We found that a quick exposure (three to 5 days) of a high fat/calorie diet has the biggest effect on astrocytes, triggering the regular signaling pathway to control the stomach. Around 10-14 days of consuming a high fat/calorie diet plan, astrocytes seem to fail to respond and the brains capability to manage calorie consumption seems to be lost. Enabling the researchers to specifically inhibit astrocytes in a specific area of the brainstem (the posterior part of the brain that links the brain to the back cord), so they could examine how private nerve cells acted to studying rats behavior when awake.

The scientists recommend that short-term calorie regulation is managed by astrocytes in the brain. A high-fat diet plan may disrupt this signaling.
A high-fat diet may impede the brains guideline of calorie consumption. New rat research in The Journal of Physiology discovered that short-term exposure to high-fat, high-calorie meals led to brain adaptation and a decrease in food consumption to balance calorie intake.
The Penn State College of Medicine researchers suggest that astrocytes (big star-shaped cells in the brain that manage several functions of nerve cells in the brain) regulate short-term calorie intake. These cells manage the signaling pathway between the gut and the brain. Constantly eating a high-fat/calorie diet seems to interrupt this signaling path.
Understanding the brains role and the intricate systems that result in overindulging, a habits that can cause weight gain and weight problems, could help establish treatments to treat it. Weight problems is a worldwide public health issue since it is associated with an increased risk of heart diseases and type 2 diabetes. In England, 63% of grownups are thought about above a healthy weight, and around half of these are living with obesity. One in three children leaving main school is obese or overweight.