April 19, 2024

Liftoff! NASA SpaceX Crew-7 Is on Its Way to International Space Station

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off the pad at 3:27 a.m. EDT on Saturday, Aug. 26, from Kennedy Space Centers Launch Complex 39A in Florida bring NASAs SpaceX Crew-7 crew members to the International Space Station. Aboard SpaceXs Dragon spacecraft are NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Andreas Mogensen, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov.
SpaceXs Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft Endurance illuminate the morning Florida sky! NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, commander; ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Andreas Mogensen, pilot; and objective experts JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov have actually begun their approximately 22-hour journey to the International Space Station on NASAs SpaceX Crew-7 objective. Liftoff happened at 3:27 a.m. EDT.
The following are updates as the rocket skyrockets upwards until Dragon Endurance reaches orbit.
Rocket Reaches Max Q.
Max Q, or the moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket, has been reached.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket raises off the pad at 3:27 a.m. EDT on Saturday, Aug. 26, from Kennedy Space Centers Launch Complex 39A in Florida carrying NASAs SpaceX Crew-7 crew members to the International Space Station. Aboard SpaceXs Dragon spacecraft are NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Andreas Mogensen, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov. SpaceXs Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft Endurance light up the early morning Florida sky! NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, leader; ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Andreas Mogensen, pilot; and objective experts JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov have actually started their around 22-hour journey to the International Space Station on NASAs SpaceX Crew-7 mission. Dragon has separated from the 2nd stage and is flying on its own.

In the next minute, the Falcon 9 rockets first phase will separate from the second stage to try a landing at SpaceXs Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. If successful, this will be the first industrial crew launch to return a booster to land– rather than going back to a droneship stationed in the Atlantic Ocean– for healing operations.
First Stage Main Engine Cutoff; First, Second Stages Separate.
The rocket has reached very first phase primary engine cutoff (MECO), and the second and very first phases have separated. Next, the second stage engine will begin.
Second Stage Engine Continues to Burn Followed by Shutdown.
The 2nd phase engine continues to burn. Were about eight minutes into flight, and all is well. In about a minute, the second stage engine will close down.
Falcon 9 First Stage Successfully Lands.
Stage 1 of the Falcon 9 rocket completed its descent and landed at SpaceXs Landing Zone 1 at nearby Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, becoming the very first booster for an industrial team flight to return to the station for recovery.
Separation Confirmed! Dragon Leaves Behind Second Stage.
Dragon has actually separated from the 2nd phase and is flying by itself. The spacecraft is traveling at approximately 17,000 miles per hour (27,000 kilometers per hour). About one minute later on, the Dragon nosecone open series will start.
Dragon Endurance Reaches Orbit.
The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft bring NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, commander; ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Andreas Mogensen, pilot; and mission professionals JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov to the International Space Station has actually safely reached orbit, and the nosecone has opened.