March 5, 2024

Futuristic AI-Based Computing Devices: Physicists Simulate Artificial Brain Networks With New Quantum Materials

The simulations are described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
As bandwidth demands on todays computers and other gadgets reach their technological limit, researchers are working towards a future in which brand-new materials can be managed to simulate the speed and accuracy of animal-like nervous systems. This sophisticated flexibility opens the door to new-age devices that are far more flexible with lower energy demands than todays gadgets.
” In the previous 50 years weve seen unbelievable technological accomplishments that resulted in computers that were progressively smaller and faster– but even these devices have limits for data storage and energy consumption,” said Frañó, who worked as one of the PNAS papers authors, in addition to previous UC San Diego chancellor, UC president and physicist Robert Dynes. “Neuromorphic computing is influenced by the emergent procedures of the millions of nerve cells, axons and dendrites that are connected all over our body in an exceptionally complex worried system.”
As experimental physicists, Frañó and Dynes are typically busy in their laboratories utilizing cutting edge instruments to explore new products. But with the onset of the pandemic, Frañó and his colleagues were pushed into seclusion with concerns about how they would keep their research study moving forward. They eventually came to the realization that they might advance their science from the perspective of simulations of quantum materials.
” This is a pandemic paper,” said Frañó. “My co-authors and I decided to study this problem from a more theoretical point of view so we sat down and began having weekly (Zoom-based) meetings. Ultimately, the idea took and established off.”
The scientists development was based upon joining 2 types of quantum substances– superconducting products based on copper oxide and metal insulator transition products that are based upon nickel oxide. They created standard “loop gadgets” that might be exactly managed at the nano-scale with helium and hydrogen, showing the way neurons and synapses are linked. Including more of these devices that connect and exchange information with each other, the simulations showed that ultimately they would allow the development of a variety of networked gadgets that display emerging properties like an animals brain.
Like the brain, neuromorphic devices are being designed to improve connections that are more vital than others, similar to the way synapses weigh more vital messages than others.
” Its surprising that when you begin to put in more loops, you start to see habits that you did not expect,” said Frañó. “From this paper we can envision doing this with 6, 20 or a hundred of these gadgets– then it gets tremendously abundant from there. Ultimately the objective is to produce a extremely big and intricate network of these gadgets that will have the capability to adapt and discover.”
With reduced pandemic restrictions, Frañó and his associates are back in the laboratory, evaluating the theoretical simulations described in the PNAS paper with real-world instruments.
Reference: “Low-temperature emergent neuromorphic networks with associated oxide gadgets” by Uday S. Goteti, Ivan A. Zaluzhnyy, Shriram Ramanathan, Robert C. Dynes and Alex Frano, 25 August 2021, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.DOI: 10.1073/ pnas.2103934118.
The authors of the paper consist of: Uday Goteti, Ivan Zaluzhnyy, Shriram Ramanathan, Robert Dynes and Alex Frañó.
The research study was supported through Q-MEEN-C, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (DE-SC0019273).

Like biologically based systems (left), intricate emerging behaviors– which arise when separate components are merged together in a collaborated system– also result from neuromorphic networks comprised of quantum-materials-based gadgets (right). Credit: UCSD
Pandemic lockdown forces a new point of view on styles for futuristic AI-based computing gadgets.
Isaac Newtons groundbreaking scientific productivity while isolated from the spread of bubonic plague is legendary. University of California San Diego physicists can now claim a stake in the annals of pandemic-driven science.
A team of UC San Diego scientists and colleagues at Purdue University have now simulated the structure of new kinds of expert system computing devices that imitate brain functions, an accomplishment that arised from the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. By combining new supercomputing materials with specialized oxides, the researchers effectively demonstrated the backbone of networks of circuits and gadgets that mirror the connectivity of nerve cells and synapses in biologically based neural networks.

As bandwidth demands on todays computers and other devices reach their technological limit, scientists are working towards a future in which new products can be orchestrated to imitate the speed and accuracy of animal-like anxious systems. They developed basic “loop devices” that could be exactly controlled at the nano-scale with helium and hydrogen, showing the method neurons and synapses are linked. Including more of these gadgets that connect and exchange information with each other, the simulations showed that ultimately they would enable the development of a selection of networked devices that display emerging homes like an animals brain.
“From this paper we can picture doing this with six, 20 or a hundred of these devices– then it gets exponentially rich from there. Eventually the goal is to develop a very large and complex network of these devices that will have the capability to adjust and learn.”