May 20, 2024

Astronomy & Astrophysics 101: Circumstellar Disc

After a star is formed, the staying dust and gas is caught in orbit, forming a turning disc or torus around the young star, understood as a circumstellar disc. The circumstellar discs around young stars are understood as protoplanetary discs, since they supply the reservoir of materials from which new planets might form. Circumstellar discs are discs of dust, gas, asteroids and other things that turn around a star. Circumstellar discs around recently formed stars are known as protoplanetary discs.

Hubbles instruments have offered detailed views of circumstellar discs, allowing astronomers to study these areas and the process of planet development. For instance, Hubbles observations of the star HD 141569A provided astronomers their clearest view yet of the dust disc around the 5-million-year-old star that lies 320 light-years away. When studying the disc of TW Hydrae, a noticeable gap in the disc was apparent. This was best explained as being because of the results of a growing, unseen world that is gravitationally sweeping up material and taking a lane in the disc, like a snow plough. As is provided for the research study of many circumstellar discs, Hubble made use of Hubbles NICMOS instrument to shut out TW Hydraes brilliant light so that the discs structure could be seen. The telescope likewise observed the discs of HD 141943 and HD 191089, which were revealed in archival Hubble images.
Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, ESA, and D. Apai and G. Schneider (University of Arizona).

Astronomers have utilized the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to take the most comprehensive photo to date of a big, edge-on, gas-and-dust disc surrounding the 20-million-year-old star Beta Pictoris. Beta Pictoris stays the only directly imaged particles disc that has a giant planet (found in 2009). Astronomers can see big motion in just a couple of years due to the fact that the orbital period is comparatively short (approximated to be between 18 and 22 years). This allows researchers to study how the Beta Pictoris disc is distorted by the existence of a massive world ingrained within the disc. This 2012 visible-light Hubble image traces the disc to within about 1050 million kilometres of the star (which is inside the radius of Saturns orbit about the Sun). Credit: NASA, ESA, and D. Apai and G. Schneider (University of Arizona).
Circumstellar discs are discs of dust, gas, asteroids and other objects that rotate around a star. Circumstellar discs around freshly formed stars are referred to as protoplanetary discs.
After a star is formed, the staying dust and gas is caught in orbit, forming a rotating disc or torus around the young star, known as a circumstellar disc. The circumstellar discs around young stars are known as protoplanetary discs, because they offer the tank of products from which brand-new planets might form. Circumstellar discs around older stars may consist of dust, gas, asteroids, comets, planets and other particles.
Circumstellar discs are discs of dust, gas, asteroids and other items that rotate around a star. Circumstellar discs around freshly formed stars are referred to as protoplanetary discs. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, ESA, and D. Apai and G. Schneider (University of Arizona).