February 26, 2024

See the Far Side of the Moon: Incredibly Detailed Pictures From Artemis I Orion Close Lunar Flyby

By SciTechDaily
November 27, 2022

The Earth is seen setting from the far side of the Moon simply beyond the Orion spacecraft in this video taken on the sixth day of the Artemis I mission by an electronic camera on the tip of one of Orions solar arrays. The spacecraft got in the lunar sphere of impact on Sunday, November 20, making the Moon, rather of Earth, the primary gravitational force acting on the spacecraft.
On the 6th day of the Artemis I mission, Orion made a close flyby of the Moon, passing about 81 miles (130 km) above the surface. During the close flyby, Orions optical navigation camera captured black-and-white pictures of craters on the Moon below. Orion uses the optical navigation cam to capture images of the Earth and the Moon at various stages and ranges, offering an improved body of data to license its effectiveness under different lighting conditions as a method to help orient the spacecraft on future missions with crew.
The Earth and Moon are tidally locked, which suggests that the Moon spins on its axis exactly when each time it orbits our planet. Because of this, people on Earth just ever see one side of the Moon. Often it is called the “dark side of the Moon,” which some people consider a misnomer since it gets simply as much sunshine as the near side of the Moon.

Here are the in-depth images of the Moon captured by Orions optical navigation video camera:

NASAs live protection of the Artemis I Close Flyby of the Moon.

The Earth is seen setting from the far side of the Moon just beyond the Orion spacecraft in this video taken on the sixth day of the Artemis I mission by an electronic camera on the suggestion of one of Orions solar ranges. The Earth and Moon are tidally locked, which implies that the Moon spins on its axis precisely when each time it orbits our world. Sometimes it is called the “dark side of the Moon,” which some people think about a misnomer since it gets simply as much sunlight as the near side of the Moon.